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ANTIQUES VIEW; THE ROLLER-COASTER ART DECO MARKET

by:Grade     2020-05-11
Written by RITA reifankl 1982, this is a digital version of an article in The Times Print Archive, before it starts online in 1996.
To keep these articles as they appear initially, the Times will not change, edit, or update them.
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Please send a report of such issues to archid_feedback @ nytimes. com.
The ups and downs of new art and decorative art materials auction sales are among the most striking in art sales in recent seasons.
Over the past decade, the highest auction price for Louis Comfort Tiffany lights has risen from around $25,000 to $360,000, an amazing upgrade.
18 months ago, the auction market for such goods began to reverse.
Early 20 sales in almost all categories
Art Deco Centuryfrom turn-of-the-
Rene Lalique glass vase for century Tiffany lamps 1920s-weakened.
The problem deepened a year ago. by last November, three top auction houses in New York had experienced difficulties --
Either the goods are not sold or the prices are plunging.
It turns out that these events are thought-provoking for art dealers and collectors who resist buying at what is considered to be inflation, and observers say this is the level set up to attract investors
During the auctions in February and April, the auction house has been insisting on lowering its reserves, and the owners will not sell them below this price.
Collectors and dealers returned to the market, cautiously optimistic about prices, with purchases well below their record levels two years ago.
\"It\'s very encouraging to see so much privatization in the market,\" Barbara E reported . \"
Deisroth is an expert in these areas in Sotheby\'s Park Bennett, New York.
60% provided in February.
At its York Avenue gallery on 72d Street, collectors bought six pieces of art.
This represents a shift in the market, she said, with dealers buying about 60% at the peak of the market.
In the February auction, five of the top six buyers were purchased by collectors.
Three of them were designed by Tiffany.
The shades of the two desk lamps are printed with Poppy and peony patterns for $31,000 and $20,000 respectively, and the third is the floor lamp, whose shades are on the edge of the Greek key pattern.
It brought $14,000.
Other categories with strong performance in sales are Handel lights, Austrian glass at Loetz, in their early 20 s
Century sterling silver, Art Deco bronze and ivory figures are printed by Demi Chiparus and Louis Icart.
\"Anything new or fresh in the market will do better,\" said Miss Deisroth . \".
Not sold is a statue of Loie Fuller. of-the-
Century dancer based on the design of Raoul Raqi.
Miss Deisroth said the reason is that the popularity of the lamp has declined and there are a lot of re-cast products in the market.
Advertising prices for Lalique glass products fell decisively.
A proper example is a glass cover ornament depicting five horses, which was sold at a market peak for $2,500 and brought $1,500 in sales in the fall of Los Angeles.
It sold in February for $1,000.
But Miss Deisroth is pleased that 17 of the 19 Lalique products found buyers in that sale, proving that the reserves are more in line with the way people are paying for these products today.
Christie\'s expert, Nancy McClelland, is also encouraged by the collector\'s important role in the gallery on Park Avenue 59 th Street at the April 3 auction.
Collectors bought seven of the most expensive items.
There are three Tiffany designs.
A lip gloss lamp for $39,000, a peony lamp for $28,000 and a rose --
Pattern lampshade for $20,000.
The other two products performed well. it was a French bronze jullebert Rucki who described the two dreamers. the mahogany glass cabinet Emile Galle, priced at $18,000, also got $18,000.
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Christie\'s sales are much less this year due to weak markets.
On 1981, Christie\'s held eight auctions, four of which were held between July.
This number has halved this year.
In addition to the sales on April, there will be a second spread on the 5 th.
Miss McClellan said sales earlier this month were in sharp contrast to sales in the fall, when \"there was no even bid --
Third, the price of these goods --
Terrible.
Ms. McClelland said the auction house would respond once buyers became more selective.
She said: \"Tiffany\'s color curtains are not sold, and we have tried to keep very good color fixtures for the main sales.
Tiffany\'s vase is 50 or 60% lower than it was 18 months ago.
Sales of Lalique fell to 1-third or one-
They are at the peak of the market.
Miss McClellan compared Larick to the poster, saying that in this recession both suffered more than anything else because they were multiples
She said that the most popular poster in the poster was the poster during the New Art Movement, and she cited Sotheby\'s recent sales, and the Alphonse Mucha poster was \"dragged away\" and was not sold or sold at a very conservative estimate.
Less than two years ago, she added, Mucha\'s posters were the stars of such sales.
Last fall, sales of posters for Phillips, Son & Neale fell sharply, with 206 out of 360 posters not being sold.
The disastrous result led Phillips to change direction and decided that it would not offer this professional sale again until there was strong demand in the market.
Another category affected by the recession is Louis Icart prints, which have performed well in the past few years.
21 when Phillips held a professional sale of 326 examples, 87 of them were not sold. By Dec.
The market fell, 54 out of 101 Icarts did not find buyers.
Such sales are no longer planned.
Phillips\'s portfolio of new art styles and decorative art designs sold in April 2 is more traditional --
Print, silver, ceramic, glass, porcelain paint, lighting and furniture.
This is a more balanced result when 95 of the 338 lots are not sold.
More importantly, the top products sold are sold within or above expectations.
Tiffany\'s two lights.
A floor lamp covered with peony costs $26,000, and a desk lamp covered with Dafu patterns costs $7,500.
The auction also showed that the bronze statue of Harriet Whitney friesmus continued to attract more viewers, with sales exceeding their pre-sale expectations: A bronze nude \"grape\" costs $5,500, and a pair of bronze vases decorated with color wolves and fairy heads cost $4,000.
A version of this article was printed on page 2002026 of the National edition on April 18, 1982 with the title: antique view; THE ROLLER-
Art market for coasters.
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