Professional custom lighting manufacturers for hotel and all kinds of engineering lamps.

construction course helps women build livesconstruction course helps women build livesconstruction course helps women build lives

by:Grade     2020-01-03
One of Hamilton\'s impoverished northern regions
In the final community, women attending the Women\'s introductory building course set up something they didn\'t expect: confidence and empowerment.
Not only did they build walls, electrical systems and bathrooms, they did not hesitate to build internal forces.
Accommodation in Catherine Robertsonat-
Parents at home, right there, learn to wire the walls and install sockets and sockets.
It was a personal victory when the switch was turned on and all the lights were on.
\"I think, wow, I\'m really good at this,\" Robertson said . \".
\"I am very proud of myself.
Coach Rebecca Ioannidis is ecstatic because her \"girl\" has been half done for 10 years --week course.
She knows their personal struggles and how hard their lives are.
\"If you can hear the cheers when we turned on the lights last week,\" she said, they saw the fruits of their labor, which was quite a long time.
\"I can\'t tell you how proud I am of these women and their efforts.
\"The course is free and runs from the basement of Eva Roswell Resource Center --
Former school
At Wentworth Street North
Classes are limited to 12 people and women learn skills in plumbing, electrical engineering, drywall, tiles and other industries.
About how much they love this class, these women don\'t speak enough.
\"Here, be patient and teach you,\" said Wendy Reyes . \".
\"Usually, people who know (their trade)
Not very good at breaking down for you.
\"Reyes values both hands --
Everyone is very supportive of my experience.
\"Have you seen these plugs?
\"She said as she picked up the end of the wire. \"We made them.
\"Yes, I know, right ? \"
We learned a lot. . .
It also gives us strength. I love it.
Reyes praised ioannidiss for its encouragement and inclusiveness.
\"Do you understand what I mean?
Ioannidis, behind her, picked up a tape knife and compound to show how to effectively cover the nails and seams in the drywall, she said.
\"She really took the time to show you.
\"Shauna Jones took out what she had learned and rewired the headlights.
\"My husband left a deep impression on me,\" she said . \"
Kristin mcalist dropped out of school in Grade 10 and helped with some carpentry work.
Now, through this course, she can do the electrical and renovation work and consider going back to school and eventually entering the university.
\"My anxiety problem is very serious and it is very helpful to me just to be with these people,\" mcalist said . \".
Classmate Jessica Fisher believes that the biggest obstacle for women in trading is lack of confidence.
\"As a woman, it feels scary to enter the industry.
But with this class, you can gain confidence and skills, \"says Fisher, who is also studying university courses now. Her sister-in-
Legal Mercedes Fisher is also in class, she said, and now she wants to be a technician in the field of construction engineering or construction, although math and measurement are not natural to her.
\"I like electrical work.
Although the drywall is boring, it is still satisfactory . \"
\"This course is very rewarding.
Ioannidis, their coach and fearless leader, said, \"It\'s about encouragement and positive thinking.
\"Classes begin at 9: 30 on Tuesday and Wednesday. m. to 12:30 p. m.
And funded through the Ontario Yanling Foundation.
There is already a short waiting list in April 23, but women can still put their names in 905575-
2489 or city school at Mohawk College.
This is the second time a course is held.
The first one is a toolbox and a footstool.
However, Ioannidis, the chief contractor and designer for 29 years, wants to teach more.
Mohawk College, who runs the course through the city school program, readily agrees, so now she\'s tasting the deals in the course.
\"I want them to be passionate and passionate.
I hope it\'s worth my time.
\"Ioannidis smiled with satisfaction as he watched the lively activities around him.
\"We got a passion here.
\"She believes that many women living in the heart will be able to\" change the sink \"for their neighbors when they finish the course, and doing so may make some money.
Ioannidis has also developed a personal interest in her students.
\"I am in the same situation as they are.
\"I graduated from high school in June and got married in September and soon got two children,\" she said . \".
\"I just want to tell them that we have a fight, whether it\'s disease, responsibility or a bunch of bills on the table.
\"That\'s why she started each lesson with a short motivational speech.
\"Have you noticed how large the ratio of the front windshield to the rearview mirror in your car is?
She took a lesson.
\"This is because the rearview mirror is there to remind us of what is behind --
The lessons we have learned, what happens to us or what we have done to us --
Hurt, sad, even our own screwsups.
\"But if we focus on the rearview mirror, there are only two things going on.
We will either miss every great opportunity that is coming or crash.
\"The big windshield is our future. It\'s today.
This is where we need to focus.
\"Cfragomeni @ thespec. com905-526-
3392 | @ cardozspec cfragomeni @ thespec. com 905-526-
3392 | @ Cargill specin one of the poor northern parts of Hamilton
In the final community, women attending the Women\'s introductory building course set up something they didn\'t expect: confidence and empowerment.
Not only did they build walls, electrical systems and bathrooms, they did not hesitate to build internal forces.
Accommodation in Catherine Robertsonat-
Parents at home, right there, learn to wire the walls and install sockets and sockets.
It was a personal victory when the switch was turned on and all the lights were on.
\"I think, wow, I\'m really good at this,\" Robertson said . \".
\"I am very proud of myself.
Coach Rebecca Ioannidis is ecstatic because her \"girl\" has been half done for 10 years --week course.
She knows their personal struggles and how hard their lives are.
\"If you can hear the cheers when we turned on the lights last week,\" she said, they saw the fruits of their labor, which was quite a long time.
\"I can\'t tell you how proud I am of these women and their efforts.
\"The course is free and runs from the basement of Eva Roswell Resource Center --
Former school
At Wentworth Street North
Classes are limited to 12 people and women learn skills in plumbing, electrical engineering, drywall, tiles and other industries.
About how much they love this class, these women don\'t speak enough.
\"Here, be patient and teach you,\" said Wendy Reyes . \".
\"Usually, people who know (their trade)
Not very good at breaking down for you.
\"Reyes values both hands --
Everyone is very supportive of my experience.
\"Have you seen these plugs?
\"She said as she picked up the end of the wire. \"We made them.
\"Yes, I know, right ? \"
We learned a lot. . .
It also gives us strength. I love it.
Reyes praised ioannidiss for its encouragement and inclusiveness.
\"Do you understand what I mean?
Ioannidis, behind her, picked up a tape knife and compound to show how to effectively cover the nails and seams in the drywall, she said.
\"She really took the time to show you.
\"Shauna Jones took out what she had learned and rewired the headlights.
\"My husband left a deep impression on me,\" she said . \"
Kristin mcalist dropped out of school in Grade 10 and helped with some carpentry work.
Now, through this course, she can do the electrical and renovation work and consider going back to school and eventually entering the university.
\"My anxiety problem is very serious and it is very helpful to me just to be with these people,\" mcalist said . \".
Classmate Jessica Fisher believes that the biggest obstacle for women in trading is lack of confidence.
\"As a woman, it feels scary to enter the industry.
But with this class, you can gain confidence and skills, \"says Fisher, who is also studying university courses now. Her sister-in-
Legal Mercedes Fisher is also in class, she said, and now she wants to be a technician in the field of construction engineering or construction, although math and measurement are not natural to her.
\"I like electrical work.
Although the drywall is boring, it is still satisfactory . \"
\"This course is very rewarding.
Ioannidis, their coach and fearless leader, said, \"It\'s about encouragement and positive thinking.
\"Classes begin at 9: 30 on Tuesday and Wednesday. m. to 12:30 p. m.
And funded through the Ontario Yanling Foundation.
There is already a short waiting list in April 23, but women can still put their names in 905575-
2489 or city school at Mohawk College.
This is the second time a course is held.
The first one is a toolbox and a footstool.
However, Ioannidis, the chief contractor and designer for 29 years, wants to teach more.
Mohawk College, who runs the course through the city school program, readily agrees, so now she\'s tasting the deals in the course.
\"I want them to be passionate and passionate.
I hope it\'s worth my time.
\"Ioannidis smiled with satisfaction as he watched the lively activities around him.
\"We got a passion here.
\"She believes that many women living in the heart will be able to\" change the sink \"for their neighbors when they finish the course, and doing so may make some money.
Ioannidis has also developed a personal interest in her students.
\"I am in the same situation as they are.
\"I graduated from high school in June and got married in September and soon got two children,\" she said . \".
\"I just want to tell them that we have a fight, whether it\'s disease, responsibility or a bunch of bills on the table.
\"That\'s why she started each lesson with a short motivational speech.
\"Have you noticed how large the ratio of the front windshield to the rearview mirror in your car is?
She took a lesson.
\"This is because the rearview mirror is there to remind us of what is behind --
The lessons we have learned, what happens to us or what we have done to us --
Hurt, sad, even our own screwsups.
\"But if we focus on the rearview mirror, there are only two things going on.
We will either miss every great opportunity that is coming or crash.
\"The big windshield is our future. It\'s today.
This is where we need to focus.
\"Cfragomeni @ thespec. com905-526-
3392 | @ cardozspec cfragomeni @ thespec. com 905-526-
3392 | @ Cargill specin one of the poor northern parts of Hamilton
In the final community, women attending the Women\'s introductory building course set up something they didn\'t expect: confidence and empowerment.
Not only did they build walls, electrical systems and bathrooms, they did not hesitate to build internal forces.
Accommodation in Catherine Robertsonat-
Parents at home, right there, learn to wire the walls and install sockets and sockets.
It was a personal victory when the switch was turned on and all the lights were on.
\"I think, wow, I\'m really good at this,\" Robertson said . \".
\"I am very proud of myself.
Coach Rebecca Ioannidis is ecstatic because her \"girl\" has been half done for 10 years --week course.
She knows their personal struggles and how hard their lives are.
\"If you can hear the cheers when we turned on the lights last week,\" she said, they saw the fruits of their labor, which was quite a long time.
\"I can\'t tell you how proud I am of these women and their efforts.
\"The course is free and runs from the basement of Eva Roswell Resource Center --
Former school
At Wentworth Street North
Classes are limited to 12 people and women learn skills in plumbing, electrical engineering, drywall, tiles and other industries.
About how much they love this class, these women don\'t speak enough.
\"Here, be patient and teach you,\" said Wendy Reyes . \".
\"Usually, people who know (their trade)
Not very good at breaking down for you.
\"Reyes values both hands --
Everyone is very supportive of my experience.
\"Have you seen these plugs?
\"She said as she picked up the end of the wire. \"We made them.
\"Yes, I know, right ? \"
We learned a lot. . .
It also gives us strength. I love it.
Reyes praised ioannidiss for its encouragement and inclusiveness.
\"Do you understand what I mean?
Ioannidis, behind her, picked up a tape knife and compound to show how to effectively cover the nails and seams in the drywall, she said.
\"She really took the time to show you.
\"Shauna Jones took out what she had learned and rewired the headlights.
\"My husband left a deep impression on me,\" she said . \"
Kristin mcalist dropped out of school in Grade 10 and helped with some carpentry work.
Now, through this course, she can do the electrical and renovation work and consider going back to school and eventually entering the university.
\"My anxiety problem is very serious and it is very helpful to me just to be with these people,\" mcalist said . \".
Classmate Jessica Fisher believes that the biggest obstacle for women in trading is lack of confidence.
\"As a woman, it feels scary to enter the industry.
But with this class, you can gain confidence and skills, \"says Fisher, who is also studying university courses now. Her sister-in-
Legal Mercedes Fisher is also in class, she said, and now she wants to be a technician in the field of construction engineering or construction, although math and measurement are not natural to her.
\"I like electrical work.
Although the drywall is boring, it is still satisfactory . \"
\"This course is very rewarding.
Ioannidis, their coach and fearless leader, said, \"It\'s about encouragement and positive thinking.
\"Classes begin at 9: 30 on Tuesday and Wednesday. m. to 12:30 p. m.
And funded through the Ontario Yanling Foundation.
There is already a short waiting list in April 23, but women can still put their names in 905575-
2489 or city school at Mohawk College.
This is the second time a course is held.
The first one is a toolbox and a footstool.
However, Ioannidis, the chief contractor and designer for 29 years, wants to teach more.
Mohawk College, who runs the course through the city school program, readily agrees, so now she\'s tasting the deals in the course.
\"I want them to be passionate and passionate.
I hope it\'s worth my time.
\"Ioannidis smiled with satisfaction as he watched the lively activities around him.
\"We got a passion here.
\"She believes that many women living in the heart will be able to\" change the sink \"for their neighbors when they finish the course, and doing so may make some money.
Ioannidis has also developed a personal interest in her students.
\"I am in the same situation as they are.
\"I graduated from high school in June and got married in September and soon got two children,\" she said . \".
\"I just want to tell them that we have a fight, whether it\'s disease, responsibility or a bunch of bills on the table.
\"That\'s why she started each lesson with a short motivational speech.
\"Have you noticed how large the ratio of the front windshield to the rearview mirror in your car is?
She took a lesson.
\"This is because the rearview mirror is there to remind us of what is behind --
The lessons we have learned, what happens to us or what we have done to us --
Hurt, sad, even our own screwsups.
\"But if we focus on the rearview mirror, there are only two things going on.
We will either miss every great opportunity that is coming or crash.
\"The big windshield is our future. It\'s today.
This is where we need to focus.
\"Cfragomeni @ thespec. com905-526-
3392 | @ cardozspec cfragomeni @ thespec. com 905-526-
Custom message
Chat Online 编辑模式下无法使用
Chat Online inputting...